Ab6bbe5c2e

Kevin Clark

CPO/Director, The Franklin Foundation for Innovation; Director/NSF XSEDE Campus Champion, Felidae Conservation Fund; Subject Matter Expert/Entrepreneur/Mentor, Penn Center for Innovation, Penn; Member, NAI Virus Focus Group, NASA Ames Research Center

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  • Jun 13, 2015

    JOINED IP NEXUS

  • Portland, Oregon, United States

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  • English

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About

Kevin B. Clark earned his Ph.D. from the Biopsychology of Learning and Memory/Brain and Cognitive Sciences Programs at Southern Illinois University in 1999. His academic lineage includes seven Nobel laureates and additional distinguished scientists. Among other professional activities, Dr. Clark serves or has served as Affiliate Member at the California NanoSystems Institute of the University of California Los Angeles: Consultant/Collaborator/Principal Investigator to the Research and Development Service at the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, NSF's Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment at the University of Illinois’ National Center for Supercomputing Applications, and the Biological Collaborative Research Environment at the University of Illinois’ NIH Center of Macromolecular Modeling and Bioinformatics: Senior Scientist/Vice President of Finance and Partnership Development of the Complex Biological Systems Alliance (an Ivy League and Oxbridge science and technology consortium): Computational Neurolinguist/Ethnobiologist for the Alliance for Linguistic Diversity and Google’s The Endangered Languages Project: Member of the IEEE Brain Initiative: Member of NASA Global Exploration Roadmap Workshop and Virus Focus Group at the NASA Astrobiology Institute: Guest Expert for National Academies Project on Astrobiology Science Strategy, Project on Public Health Emergencies, Workshop on Emerging Neurotechnologies Legalities, Workshop on Microbial Threat Economics, Workshop on Mobile Health Technologies, Workshop on Student Public Health: Subject Matter Expert, Entrepreneur, and Mentor at the Penn Center for Innovation of the University of Pennsylvania: Entrepreneurship Incubation Finalist, Brainstorm Innovation Labs, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford School of Medicine: Member, User Program Community, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley Lab: Bioconservationist and Board of Directors Member of the Felidae Conservation Fund: Science/Business Advisor to many proprietary and independent nonprofit organizations promoting new, rediscovery, and translational medical science, clinical practice, and biotechnology: Analytics Platform Consultant for the IEEE: Mentor at NeuroLaunch, CyberLaunch, NeuroLex Laboratories, and Oregon Translational Research and Development Institute: Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics: Laboratory Coordinator and Basic/Clinical Science Predoctoral Research Fellow in the Departments of Psychology, Physiology, and Plant Biology at Southern Illinois University: Member of many professional societies: Editor for numerous professional journals and technical books: Member of Oregon Department of Education ESSA State Planning Workgroups/Public Forums and Portland Public Schools’ Modernization Master Planning Commission: and Manager/Technical Advisor/Mentor for STEAM scholastic, entrepreneurial, and community outreach programs sponsored by the Society for Neuroscience, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, FIRST, TiE/TYE, NSF, and The Franklin Foundation, where he is Chief Programs Officer and sits on the Executive Board of Directors. He also has (co)authored over 60 peer-review scientific journal articles and book chapters, helped generate millions of US dollars in research funding, licensed several patents, and received multimedia press attention from Reuters, American Psychological Association, Discover Magazine, The Pharmaceutical Journal, Fox News, Nature Neuropod, National Geographic, and other news sources for his collaborative science, entrepreneurial, and charitable activities.

Dr. Clark has spent much of his research career using his training in disciplines of engineering, psychology, biochemistry/biophysics, physiology, neuroscience, and microbiology to study the evolution and biological basis of learning, memory, and intelligence. Dr. Clark’s award-winning research and patented inventions improving learning, memory, and recovery from traumatic brain injury through peripheral neuromodulation gained recognition from MacArthur fellow Dr. James McGaugh and other members of the National Academy of Sciences, USA. This work was instrumental in the US Food and Drug Administration’s decision to approve Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) for complex-partial seizures – the only medical device therapy currently marketed for treatment of convulsive epilepsy – and has encouraged potential derivative VNS indications for Alzheimer's disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, and tinnitus, among other pathologies. This work subsequently helped motivate the launch of the Defense Advanced Research Programs Agency's Targeted Neuroplasticity Training Program in 2016. Later comparative primate studies conducted with systems neuroscientist Dr. Nikos Logothetis focused on Dr. Clark’s interests in the neural basis of cognition across animal phylogeny, particularly cross-taxa models of perceptual and conceptual priming. Some of this research inspired Dr. Clark’s current work into natural and technology-based classical and quantum Hebbian learning in cognitive processing, nonrelativistic and relativistic information processing in spatial cognition, and entropic uncertainty in language privatization, disambiguation, and structure. His broader interests in the evolution of intelligent behavior largely began in graduate school while working with molecular and cellular evolutionist Dr. Sidney Fox, student and colleague of Nobelists Thomas Hunt Morgan and Linus Pauling, on protocell models of learning and memory and continue today with studies involving microbial sociality. By creating paradigms comparing microbial goal-directed behavior with animal decision making, Dr. Clark has shown microbes learn to behave as soft-matter quantum computers. These computational abilities, conforming to attributes of quantum Hebbian networks, putatively stem from cellular response regulation mediated by phylogenetically ubiquitous receptor-dependent fire-diffuse-fire Ca2+ reactions and quantum/classical molecular logic and memory systems. The major implications of Dr. Clark’s ground-breaking findings regarding microbial behavior and physiology have been acknowledged by noted experts worldwide for providing fundamental insights into cellular response regulation and into sensor, command, and control platforms useful for next-generation smart medical, industrial, and national defense nano/microbiotechnologies. His work extends to many topics, including, but not limited to, host-parasite and pathogen-pathogen interactions, cellular decision making, natural and “cognitive” computing, pharmaceutical and epidemiological control of infectious diseases, neural and aneural plasticity, learning and memory, problem solving, perception, information representation and processing, social behavior, adaptation to extreme environments, emergence of evolutionary and developmental transitions, sustainable human development, protection of endangered cultural heritages and diversity, ecosystem conservation and resource management, green energy production, bioremediation and -extraction, and theragnostic and regenerative medicine.

Moreover, as a peer-respected and award-winning scientist, technologist, educator, community liaison, and business leader, Dr. Clark demonstrates a history of creating local, national, and global (urban and rural) community outreach, educational, and business programs that improve career pipelines and workforce diversity, personalized and team instruction, discovery culture, organization branding and scaling, and product/services design, development, and commercialization in STEAM fields of interest. His past and current work, in collaboration with professional societies, corporate technology giants, world-class tertiary academic/research institutions, government agencies, community-centered organizations, and public school districts, help stimulate STEAM innovation by establishing progressive government-industry-academia-community partnerships, special student/professional curricular and entrepreneurial programs, and advanced interactive (cognitive computing- and neuroscience-based) performance and assessment methods. These endeavors, though framed within a larger geosocioeconomic mission and discourse, often take the form of small local or regional reform action beneficial for crafting stronger business and education strategies, policies, practices, and long-term positive outcomes for stakeholders and society, such as inspiring, informing, and enabling generations of people for better problem assessment and understanding, innovative solution discovery, and systematic preparedness, responsiveness, and resolution to some of Humanity's grand challenges.

Work history

1. Research Assistant, Department of Psychology, Oregon State University, Work-study/Full-time Position, 1988-1991
• Duties/Skills: Basal ganglia and subthalamic nuclei single-unit recordings from anesthetized rats (verified by antidromic stimulation); off- and on-line data analysis using R. C. Electronics EGAA system; electrolytic and excitotoxic lesions; cathetorization of femoral vein; tissue fixation and staining; immunocytochemical labeling of tyrosine hydroxylase; training students.
• Supervisor: Lawrence J. Ryan, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor

2. Research Assistant, Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University, Half-time Position, 1991-1993
• Duties/Skills: Infant-referral electrophysiological testing for auditory dysfunction; auditory evoked potential testing of language development in normal infants, children, and adults (using silver cup electrode and electrode cap applications of a 10-20 system variation); visual evoked potential testing in normal adults for a backprojection neural network application for traumatic brain injured patients; outfitting and operating a mobile electrophysiology unit for home visits to subjects in rural Southern Illinois; elementary neurological screening, including: standardized air-conduction threshold screening test, standardized visual acuity test (Rosenbaum Pocket Vision Screener), standardized handedness inventory (Edinburgh Handedness Inventory); off- and on-line data analysis using EPACS system software; computer program tracing and debugging; subject scheduling; training research and student assistants.
• Supervisor: Dennis L. Molfese, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Professor; Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, School of Medicine, Chairperson

• Duties/Skills: Radial-arm maze, T-maze, and plus maze training; inhibitory-avoidance (passive avoidance) training; multi-unit recording in anesthetized rats; microinfusion in freely moving rats; development of Basic, Fortran, and Pascal programing tools.
• Supervisors: Douglas C. Smith, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; Cross-appointment, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine; Robert A. Jensen, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; College of Liberal Arts, Associate Dean

3. Research Assistant, Departments of Psychology and Physiology, Southern Illinois University, Half-time Position, 1993-1994
• Duties/Skills: See above description for 2; HPLC assays for monoamines; maximal electroshock paradigm for epilepsy in the rat; unilateral chronic implantation of cuff electrodes on the cervical vagus in rats; extracellular multi-unit recordings in brain slice preparations; microdialysis with on-line HPLC assays for norepinephrine release in anesthetized and freely moving rats (in collaboration with Drs. John Dailey and Phillip Jobe); training graduate and undergraduate assistants.
• Supervisors: Douglas C. Smith, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; Cross-appointment, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine; Ronald A. Browning, Ph.D., Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Professor; John W. Dailey, Ph.D., Department of Basic Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Professor; Phillip Jobe, Ph.D., Department of Basic Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Professor

4. Teaching Assistant (Course Title: Biological and Psychological Effects of Recreational Drugs), Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University, Quarter-time Position, Fall, 1994
• Duties/Skills: Multimedia technical assistant for lectures; make exams; grade homework.
• Supervisor: Douglas C. Smith, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; Cross-appointment, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine

5. Research Assistant/Laboratory Coordinator, Departments of Psychology, Physiology, and Plant Biology, Southern Illinois University, Quarter-time Position, Spring, 1995
• Duties/Skills: Laboratory oversight; See above description for 3; Characterization of electrical properties (extracellular and intracellular recordings) of individual and networked polymerized thermal protein microspheres (in collaboration with Dr. Sydney Fox) and lipid bilayers incorporated with acrosomal potassium channels (in collaboration with Dr. Thomas Cox) as models for protocell learning and memory; microdialysis with on-line HPLC assays for norepinephrine release in the anesthetized and freely moving rat (in collaboration with Drs. John Dailey and Phillip Jobe).
• Supervisors: Douglas C. Smith, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; Cross-appointment, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine; Sidney Fox, Ph.D., Department of Plant Biology, Professor; Thomas Cox, Ph.D., Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Professor; John W. Dailey, Ph.D., Department of Basic Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Professor; Phillip Jobe, Ph.D., Department of Basic Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Professor

6. Teaching Assistant (Course Title: Child Development), Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University, Quarter-time Position, Spring, 1995
• Duties/Skills: Make exams; grade homework; lead review sessions
• Supervisor: Dennis L. Molfese, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Professor; Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, School of Medicine, Chairperson

7. Predoctoral Research Fellow/Laboratory Coordinator, Departments of Psychology and Physiology, Southern Illinois University, Sponsored by Epilepsy Foundation of America, Summer, 1995
• Duties/Skills: Laboratory oversight; see above description for 3; evaluation of CNS monoamines as a possible mechanism for the seizure-attenuating effects of vagus nerve stimulation.
• Supervisor: Douglas C. Smith, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; Cross-appointment, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine; Ronald A. Browning, Ph.D., Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Professor

8. Predoctoral Research Fellow/Laboratory Coordinator, Departments of Psychology and Physiology, Southern Illinois University, Sponsored by Cyberonics, Inc., 1995-1997
• Duties/Skills: Laboratory oversight; see above description for 3; evaluation of CNS monoamines as a possible mechanism for the seizure-attenuating and memory-enhancing effects of vagus nerve stimulation; participation in the design, coordination, and operation of a study, ancillary to a phase 3 FDA clinical trial, evaluating the possible memory-enhancing effects of vagus nerve stimulation in humans.
• Supervisors: Robert A. Jensen, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; College of Liberal Arts, Associate Dean; Douglas C. Smith, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; Cross-appointment, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine; Ronald A. Browning, Ph.D., Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Professor; Dean K. Naritoku, M.D., Acting Chair, Departments of Neurology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine

9. Research Assistant/Laboratory Coordinator, Departments of Psychology and Physiology, Southern Illinois University, Half-time Position, 1997-1998
• Duties/Skills: Laboratory oversight; see above description for 8; investigation of phase coherence between local field potentials, as well as multiunit activity, recorded from the dentate gyrus and infralimbic region of the medial frontal cortex of anesthetized and freely moving rats following vagus nerve stimulation; investigation of possible changes in synaptic plasticity and single unit firing rates and patterns recorded from the dentate gyrus and infralimbic region of the medial frontal cortex following vagus nerve stimulation; evaluation of the effects of vagus nerve stimulation on the recovery of function from ischemia and hypoxia in behaving rats; investigation of changes single-unit activity from the locus coeruleus following intracerebral microinfusion.
• Supervisors: Robert A. Jensen, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; College of Liberal Arts, Acting Dean; Douglas C. Smith, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; Cross-appointment, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine; Ronald A. Browning, Ph.D., Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Professor

10. Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Physiology of Cognitive Processing, Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Full-time Position, 1999-2000
• Duties/Skills: Handling and behavioral training of non-human primates on several visual perception tasks, including shape, color, size, orientation, and surface-order discrimination designed to evaluate the neurophysiological basis of perceptual and conceptual priming; Research and development of cross-taxa paradigms for priming; Single and multiunit electrophysiology in awake non-human primates; sterile surgery in non-human primates; C++ and script language (TCL or Tickle) programming of visual stimuli construction and delivery and appetitive reward delivery.
• Supervisor: Nikos K. Logothetis, Ph.D., Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Director of Department of Physiology of Cognitive Processing

11. Uncompensated (WOC) Basic Research/Clinical Scientist, Research and Development Service, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, 2002-present
• Research Projects: Research and development of drug repurposing and of intelligent molecular and cellular systems.
• Services Rendered: Review of protocol for research and development of rapid on-site detection/identificaion of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals using instrumented K-9s; advising on protocol and execution of retrospective clinical study (or chart study) evaluating efficacy of repurposed drugs to treat infectious diseases; theoretical molecular biology/protein chemistry identification of possible new and repurposed drugs to treat viral, bacterial, fungal, and protozoan infectious diseases (i.e., rational drug design and retasking); application of classical, quantum, relativistic, and Kaluza-Klein computational/ informational approaches to characterize microbial decision making and natural computing abilities in social and nonsocial contexts; application of classical and quantum computational/logical approaches to identify, research, and develop cellular and molecular logic systems for smart (semi)autonomous sensor, command, and control platforms useful for theragnostic and regenerative medicine, payload delivery, industrial fabrication, bioremediation and -extraction, green energy production, and other technologies.
• Collaborators: Edward M. Eisenstein, M.D., Ph.D., Research and Development Service, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Health Care System; Scott E. Krahl, Ph.D., Deputy Associate Chief of Staff for Research, Research and Development Service, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Health Care System; Associate Adjunct Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California at Los Angeles

12. Senior Scientist/Vice President of Finance and Partnership Development, Complex Biological Systems Alliance, 2014-2015
• Responsibilities: Oversight in establishing a partnership network composed of major industry (pharma, tech, and biotech), academic, government, military, and charitable entities to further the science and technology mission of the CBSA, a nonprofit consortium of mainly Ivy League and Oxbridge scientists interested in understanding and applying the foundations of information in biology and disease. Partnership relations are targeted to expand the CBSA’s science and technology infrastructure, encourage research and development and intellectual property commercialization for CBSA and partner endeavors, and provide venture capital investment, grant, and endowment monies to secure alignment as a core Bioinformatics Facility and Faculty Training Center in the Research Computing Division of Harvard Medical School.
• Negotiated/Planned Partnership Portfolio: Alzheimer’s Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control Foundation, Cures Within Reach, NASA Ames Research Center, National Foundation for Cancer Research, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, NIH Center for Macromolecular Modeling and Bioinformatics, Pfizer, Inc., and SETI Institute.
• Research Projects: Research and development of classical and quantum biomolecular logic, memory, and multianalyte sensor/actuator systems for nano- and microscale technologies; biophysical and -chemical modeling of allosteric ion channel ligand cooperativity, activation kinetics, autocatalysis, modulator interactions, and long-range signal conduction and dynamics; rational drug/device/materials design and repurposing.

13. Member, Science Advisory, Grant Review, and Rediscovery Research Portal (CureAccelerator) Advisory Boards, Cures Within Reach, 2014-present
• Services Rendered: Advising on emerging new and rediscovery medical science and technology, on scientific and medical merits of prospective fundable basic and clinical research, and on development and use of Robert-Wood-Johnson-Foundation-supported open-access world-wide-web platform for interfacing philanthropic funding of biomedical research with market needs as well as knowledge-based medical discovery for patients, medical science and healthcare professionals, and interested private and public sector organizations

14. Member, Science Advisory Board, Global Cures, Inc., 2014-present
• Services Rendered: Advising on development and use of Robert-Wood-Johnson-Foundation-supported open-access world-wide-web platform for interfacing philanthropic funding of biomedical research with market needs as well as knowledge-based medical discovery for patients, medical science and healthcare professionals, and interested private and public sector organizations

15. Affiliate Member, California NanoSystems Institute, University of California Los Angeles, 2014-present
• Research Projects: See above description for 11 and 12. (Membership information was mishandled by Institute representatives, resulting in an on-going legal inquiry since August 2017.)

16. Collaborator/Consultant, National Science Foundation Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2014-present
• Research Projects: Analytical and numerical study of quantum, relativistic, and extradimensional physical properties of biologically active Ca2+ waves influencing native substrate structure/function and nano-/microsystem applications.

17. Member, Biological Collaborative Research Environment (BioCoRE), Theoretical and Computational Biophysics Group, NIH Center for Macromolecular Modeling and Bioinformatics, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2014-2017
• Research Projects: Biophysical and -chemical modeling of allosteric ion channel ligand cooperativity, activation kinetics, autocatalysis, modulator interactions, and long-range signal conduction and dynamics; rational drug/device/materials design and repurposing.

18. BioMentor, Oregon Bioscience Incubator, Oregon Translational Research and Development Institute (OTRADI), 2014-present
• Services Rendered: Advising OTRADI clients, partners, and other stakeholders in areas of partnership development to encourage research, development, and commercialization of intellectual property and to provide venture capital investment, grant, and endowment monies for business growth. Additional advising include science and technology funding and product trends, basic and clinical science protocols, grant proposal review and development, and reduction-to-practice and technology-transfer strategies for neuroscience and microbiology interests.

19. Biotechnology Business Consultant/Contractor, The Sage Group, 2014-present
• Services Rendered: Advising The Sage Group, its partners, and clients on science, technology, and business administration matters.

20. Mentor, NeuroLaunch, 2014-present
• Services Rendered: Advising NeuroLaunch clients, partners, and other stakeholders in areas of partnership development to encourage research, development, and commercialization of intellectual property and to provide venture capital investment, grant, and endowment monies for business growth as well as in science and technology funding and product trends, basic science and clinical protocols, and reduction-to-practice and technology-transfer strategies for neuroscience interests, particularly drug/device/materials innovation.

21. Member, Board of Directors, The Franklin Foundation, 2015-2016
• Responsibilities: Serving The Franklin Foundation, its strategic academic, corporate, government, and military partners, and other stakeholders as Advisor, Ambassador, Advocate, and Solicitor for missions in philanthropy-based advancement of American sciences, mathematics, and technology innovation. Core programs and services seek to enact educational reform and secure the United States’ geosocioeconomic future through private and public outreach/collaboration, funding initiatives, and national, state, county, and district policy implementation.

22. Intellectual Property Consultant, IP Nexus, 2015-present
• Services Rendered: Advising IP Nexus clients, partners, and other stakeholders on research, development, and commercialization of emerging new and rediscovery biomedical science and technology, including science and technology funding and product trends, basic science and clinical protocols, product and business development plans, and reduction-to-practice and technology-transfer strategies for drug/device/materials innovation.

23. Senior Expert, Guidepoint Global, 2015-present
• Services Rendered: Advising Guidepoint Global clients, partners, and other stakeholders on research, development, and commercialization in aerospace and defense, energy, healthcare, and technology sectors. Specialty areas cover stakeholder missions in nano- and microbiotechnology, neuroscience, microbiology, and natural and artificial ecology.

24. Mentor, CyberLaunch, 2015-present
• Responsibilities: Advising CyberLaunch clients, partners, and other stakeholders in areas of partnership development and business operation in the cybersecurity sector, including research, development, and commercialization of intellectual property as well as obtaining venture capital investment, grant, and endowment monies for business start-up, growth, and scaling needs.

25. Member, Master Planning, PreDesign Advisory, and Design Advisory Committee, Benson Polytechnic High School, Portland Public Schools, 2016
• Responsibilities: Representing/advising stakeholder groups in the curricular and infrastructure modernization of Benson Polytechnic High School and in the revitalization of the school's legacy as a national leader in CTE/STEAM secondary education. Duties include reviewing Long Range Facilities Plan, Education Facilities Vision and relevant Education Specifications; reviewing school, site, cost and jurisdictional factors which must be considered in determining master plan, programming, schematic design, and design options; helping develop effective communication strategies to reach entire school community for public participation events; contributing to master plan visioning, guiding principles and programming: assisting with public workshops and open house events; and regularly attending work-sessions during the programming and master planning processes.

26. Member, Board of Directors, Felidae Conservation Fund, 2016-present
• Responsibilities: Serving the Felidae Conservation Fund, scientists, educators, NGOs, government agencies, international communities, policy makers, and other stakeholders as Leader, Advisor, Advocate, Solicitor, and Conservationist in the mission of wild felid preservation. Duties include oversight and development of forward-looking strategies and technology promoting wild cat bioconservation and interactive global public education about threatened wildlife and ecosystems. The Fund partners with and provides leadership for world-class research organizations as well as supplies strategy, planning, funding, media, field support and logistical assistance for scientific studies.

27. Member, Every Student Succeeds Act State Planning Workgroups/Public Forums, Oregon Department of Education, 2016-2017
• Services Rendered: Advising/Representing the Oregon Department of Education and stakeholders on developing and launching a comprehensive and collaborative state plan for the implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the 2015 reauthorized federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Workgroups/Public forums involving areas of Standards and Assessment, Accountability, School and District Improvement, and Educator Effectiveness, seek to advance teaching, learning and student achievement in the State of Oregon through improved student outcomes and graduation rates: increased educational equity and closure of the state’s achievement and opportunity gaps: ensuring high-quality teacher instruction and administrative leadership: and leveraging effective strategies for transforming underperforming schools and districts.

28. Computational Neurolinguist/Ethnobiologist, Alliance for Linguistic Diversity and The Endangered Languages Project launched and powered by Google, 2016-present
• Research Projects: Complexity, information theoretic, and statistical mechanical modeling/assessment of communication/language perception, comprehension, and production in varying evolutionary and ecological contexts, with emphasis on classical and quantum approaches for understanding communication privatization, disambiguation, and structure; cognitive computing technology development; preservation of endangered languages by accelerating, strengthening and catalyzing efforts around endangered language documentation, to support communities engaged in protecting and revitalizing their languages, and to raise awareness about ways to address threats to endangered languages.

29. Chief Programs Officer and Executive Member, Board of Directors, The Franklin Foundation, 2016-present
• Board of Directors Office Responsibilities: Serving The Franklin Foundation, its strategic academic, corporate, government, and military partners, and other stakeholders as Leader, Advisor, Ambassador, Advocate, and Solicitor for missions in philanthropy-based advancement of American sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics education and innovation. Core programs and services seek to enact educational reform and secure the United States’ geosocioeconomic future through private and public outreach/collaboration, funding initiatives, and national, state, county, and district policy implementation.
• Corporate Executive Office Responsibilities: Chief Programs Officer (CPO) is responsible for the development, management, and delivery of partnered educational STEAM programs. Partnered Foundation programs, including National Labs Network Program, NeuroEducation Program, Women in Science and Women in Technology Programs, BrightStart Parents’ Program, Experience Program, Special Events Program, and Educational Grants and Scholarships Program, seek to promote and craft stronger practical educational policies, strategies, methods, and broad long-term positive outcomes for students, families, and society. By working with top-tier universities, cutting-edge edtechnology corporations, public school districts, community-centered organizations, government institutions and agencies, STEAM professional associations, and many other stakeholders, the Foundation advances understanding and innovation of educational standards and assessment, accountability, school and district improvement, educator effectiveness, and student attainment.

30. Campus Champion, National Science Foundation Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Felidae Conservation Fund (FCF) and Bay Area Puma Project (BAPP), 2017-present.
• Responsibilities: Overseeing the development, launch, and management of XSEDE training, education, and outreach services, such as, but not limited to, XSEDE Student Engagement, Broadening Participation and Campus Bridging, Scholars, and Curriculum and Educator Programs, at FCF, BAPP, and their business, government, research, and educational organizational partners and private individual stakeholders. Duties include inspiring, informing, and enabling generations of people to use computational and data sciences to solve Humanity’s grand ecoplanetary challenges by: 1) providing advice/information to individuals and institutions on new and updated cyberinfrastructure (CI) resources, services, and offerings at the national level, 2) providing advice/information on how to best serve the institutions’ computing- and
data-intensive research, education, and scholarly endeavors, 3) providing education, training, and professional development at conferences, meetings, training events, and through online platforms, 4) pursuing start-up allocations of computing time to help local users initiate projects involving relevant national CI resources, and 5) raise awareness through multimedia outlets about presence, impact, and recruiting opportunities of the Campus Champions Program for research, education and scholarly endeavors.

31. Analytics Platform Consultant, Analytics Products, Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017 (July to September).
• Services Rendered: Evaluation of InnovationQ Plus and other analytics platforms, in conjunction with Cures Within Reach, Oregon Translational Research and Development Institute, IP Nexus, NeuroLaunch, and CyberLaunch.

32. Member, Brain Initiative, Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017-present.
• Responsibilities: An IEEE technical community for practitioners and researchers in the area of brain research, the mission of IEEE Brain is to facilitate cross-disciplinary collaboration and coordination to advance research, standardization, and development of technologies in neuroscience that help improve the human condition. Members, participating through the IEEE Brain Initiative and multiple Societies and Councils, dedicate themselves to working with academia, government, and industry to advance technologies that improve understanding of brain function, revolutionize current abilities to reverse engineer neural circuits in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, develop new approaches to interface the brain with machines for augmenting human-machine interaction, mitigate effects of neurological disease and injury, and much more, such as specifically contributing in areas of targeted neuroplasticity training, interactive smart integrated machine-learning platforms, and biomolecular logic/memory systems important for neuronal response regulation and for creating next-generation neuromorphic architectures, among other technologies.

33. Member, NASA Global Exploration Roadmap Community Workshop, Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, 2017.
• Services Rendered: Assisting NASA in the development of the Global Exploration Roadmap (GER), particularly, but not limited to, areas involving human health and performance. The GER is a publication authored by NASA and the other 14 space agencies that comprise the International Space Exploration Coordination Group. The roadmap outlines a phased approach for achieving the common goal of sending humans to the surface of Mars. The Workshop is comprised of two sessions. The first session covers mission concepts for cislunar space, the Moon, and Mars, focusing on all that can be enabled by capabilities envisioned in the GER. The second session targets internal and external member discussions and feedback regarding mission functions suited for possible commercial services. Discussions include plans for future human exploration missions, such as in-situ resource utilization.

34. Subject Matter Expert, Entrepreneur, and Mentor, Penn Center for Innovation, University of Pennsylvania, 2017-present.
• Services Rendered: Assisting University of Pennsylvania Faculty to research, develop, and commercialize intellectual property by facilitating and implementing partnerships via licensing, sponsored research, start-up business creation, and alliance building. Specific science, technology and industry expertise provided include chemical processes and synthesis: design, education tools, and multimedia: diagnostics: digital health: hardware, circuits, and sensors: information technology, communication, and networking: materials: medical devices: robotics: software, data science, algorithms, and apps: therapeutics and vaccines: veterinary medicine and animal health.

35. Guest Expert, Project on the Astrobiology Science Strategy for the Search for Life in the Universe, Space Studies and Life Sciences Boards, Divisions of Engineering and Physical Science and of Earth and Life Sciences, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2018.
• Services Rendered: Providing stakeholder input to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in their preparation for upcoming decadal surveys in astronomy and astrophysics and planetary science and in their efforts to carry out a study on the astrobiology science strategy as it relates to the search for life in the solar system and extrasolar planetary systems. This public enterprise falls under the oversight of the Space Studies and Life Sciences Boards, Divisions of Engineering and Physical Science and of Earth and Life Sciences, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in accordance with the Statement of Task presented in the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015, including, but not limited to, identifying areas of significant scientific or technological progress since publication of the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015, identifying important scientific or technological topics omitted from the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015 and which have seen advancement since publication of the strategy, identifying promising key research goals in the field of the search for signs of life in which progress is likely in the next 20 years, identifying key technological challenges in astrobiology as they pertain to the search for life in the solar system and extrasolar planetary systems, identifying key scientific questions in astrobiology as they pertain to the search for life in the solar system and extrasolar planetary systems, discussing scientific advances that can be addressed by U.S. and international space missions and relevant groundbased activities in operation or funded and in development, discuss how to expand partnerships (interagency, international and public/private) in furthering the study of life’s origin, evolution, distribution, and future in the universe.

36. Research Affiliate and Member of Virus Focus Group, NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, 2018-present.
• Research Project(s) and Responsibilities: Computational studies of virus-host coopting mechanisms optimizing timing and effectiveness of infection stages against barriers to host invasion, pathogenesis, replication, release, host manipulation, and life origins and evolution. Assisting the NAI Virus Focus Group in its mission to provide a forum for researchers from many disciplines, both within the NAI and the broader science community, to define and address fundamental questions in astrovirology, review the current state of knowledge in this area, and formulate new areas of research to advance our understanding of how viruses may have influenced the origin and evolution of life here on Earth, and perhaps elsewhere in the Universe.

37. Guest Expert, Project on Evidence-Based Practices for Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response, Health Sciences Policy and Population Health and Public Health Practice Boards, Division of Health and Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2018.
• Services Rendered: Providing stakeholder input to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in their comprehensive effort to conduct an ad hoc committee review and grading of public health emergency preparedness and response practices, based on literature/evidence generated since September 11, 2001. The committee, sponsored by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, uses published literature and publicly available reports, public input and information gathering sessions, and the committee’s original analysis and reasoning to assess and prioritize fifteen critical preparedness and response capabilities (“PHEP capabilities”) defined in the CDC’s Public Health Preparedness Capabilities: National Standards for State and Local Planning. In identifying and evaluating literature/evidence for preparedness and response practices for each of the PHEP capabilities and functions, the committee focuses on evidence applicable to state, territorial, local, and tribal public health preparedness and response practitioners. Areas of concentration include: 1) development of methodology for conducting and grading a comprehensive review of the literature/evidence base for public health preparedness and response practices, 2) development and application of criteria to determine which PHEP capabilities and subfunctions should be prioritized for inclusion in the comprehensive review, along with other topics that have emerged as important across multiple capabilities but which are not adequately represented within the current set; 3) identification of research regarding preparedness and response practices within the prioritized PHEP capabilities and functions and apply the committee’s evidence review methodology to assess the quality of and summarize the body of evidence regarding effectiveness of these practices; 4) issuing of conclusions for preparedness and response practices within the prioritized areas that communities and federal, state, territorial, tribal, and/or local agencies could adopt, based on evidence demonstrating the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of those practices; 5) issuing of recommendations for future research needed to address critical gaps in evidence-based preparedness and response practices, including, as appropriate, additional research on promising but not yet proven practices within the prioritized PHEP capabilities and functions, as well as processes needed to improve the overall quality of evidence within the field.

38. Guest Expert, Workshop on Neuroforensics: Exploring the Legal Implications for Emerging Neurotechnologies, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Division of Health and Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2018.
• Services Rendered: Providing stakeholder input to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on the development, research, commercialization and use of emerging neurotechnologies. This public workshop, under the auspices of the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders and in collaboration with the Committee on Science, Technology, and the Law (CSTL), brings together leaders from academia, judicial and law enforcement systems, industry, government and regulatory agencies, nonprofit foundations and other stakeholders to explore and advance efforts to identify and evaluate the potential effects of emerging neurotechnologies on the legal system. Workshop objectives include: 1) providing an overview of current state-of-the-art neurotechnologies relevant to legal systems and the use and impact of neuroscience evidence in the legal system, 2) exploring emerging neurotechnologies, including methods for observing or manipulating the central nervous system, the genetics of cognition and behavior, and their potential implications and use by law enforcement, the courts, administrative proceedings, regulatory agencies and other bodies, 3) considering the potential use of large genetics databases and behavioral genetics by the legal system, 4) discussing the ethical and societal considerations associated with the use of neuroscience evidence in criminal, administrative, and other judicial proceedings, 5) highlighting topics at the nexus of emerging neurotechnologies and the law for further study, such as potential opportunities for developing standards for utilizing evidence from emerging neurotechnologies in the legal system and identifying potential stakeholders across sectors that may be impacted by this multidisciplinary area.

39. Guest Expert, Workshop on Harnessing Mobile Technology to Predict, Diagnose, Monitor, and Develop Treatments for Nervous System Disorders, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Division of Health and Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2018.
• Services Rendered: Providing stakeholder input to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on the development, research, commercialization and use of emerging mobile health technologies. This public workshop, under the auspices of the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders, brings together diverse authorities to explore and advance efforts to use devices for promising reliable, high quality, continuous prediction, diagnosis, monitoring, adherence/compliance, and treatment of CNS disorders (e.g., Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, mood disorders, and schizophrenia), including enabling major advances in identifying prodromal and subclinical states as well as important technological, methodological, ethical, privacy, security, and regulatory issues.. Workshop objectives include: 1) exploring innovative approaches to using device and mobile health technology to predict, diagnose, monitor, assess adherence, and develop treatments for CNS disorders, including discussion of methodology, analytical techniques, and the evidence needed to validate the data for use in research and the clinic, 2) sharing approaches and lessons across efforts to apply device and mobile health technology in different CNS disorders and identify opportunities for collaboration, and 3) discussing regulatory, privacy, ethical, security, and practical issues that specifically arise when using devices for CNS disorders, such as collection, analysis, storage, and use of behavioral information and assuring parity in access to these technologies (e.g., data validation, open source platforms for obtaining and distributing digital biomarker data, behavioral and digital phenotyping, data-driven learning engines, use of real-world evidence, cost and infrastructure for data storage and analysis, data integration with clinical records, data ownership and release).

40. Guest Expert, Workshop on Understanding the Economics of Microbial Threats, Board on Global Health, Division of Health and Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2018
• Services Rendered: Providing stakeholder input to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on the interaction of economic activity and microbial threats including infectious disease outbreaks and antimicrobial resistance. This public workshop, under the auspices of the Forum on Microbial Threats, brings together diverse authorities to explore and advance efforts to identify, develop, and deploy key metrics of risk and analytical tools to provide a comprehensive understanding of the economic risk that microbial threats pose. The workshop also explores approaches to incorporating estimates of infectious disease risk to overall macroeconomic assessments of economic growth in countries to incentivize actions that minimize these threats. Workshop themes include: 1) economic costs from infectious diseases that may place a disproportionate burden on low- and middle income countries but impact regional and global stability due to interconnected financial systems worldwide, 2) gaps in assessing economic costs of microbial threats through multiple channels of disruption, including dynamics of fear-based behavioral change, 3) critical opportunities and challenges to model and develop metrics of risk and to build analytical tools to understand the potential economic consequences of infectious diseases on the short, medium, and long term, 4) strategies to incorporate estimates of infectious disease risk to overall macroeconomic assessments of economic growth to ensure the risks are reflected in financial markets and business investment decisions or influence flows of development assistance, and to link these assessments to incentives for action to minimize the threats, 5) implications for International Health Regulations, particularly on trade and travel measures, as well as for upstream and downstream strategies, policies, and interventions—such as effective communication messages, simulation exercises, investment decisions, and One Health approaches—that various sectors of government, multilateral institutions, and others may carry out in preventing and mitigating the economic costs, 6) collaboration and coordination mechanisms among various stakeholders and across sectors in public health, animal health, economics, travel, trade, commerce, agriculture, among others.

41. Guest Expert, Workshop on School Success: An Opportunity for Public Health Action, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, Division of Health and Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2018
• Services Rendered: Providing stakeholder input to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on aspects of preK-12 education metrics relevant and potentially useful to the health sector, given the major influence of education on health outcomes and community well-being. This public workshop, under the auspices of the Roundtable on Population Health Improvement, brings together diverse authorities to explore and advance efforts to identify, develop, and deploy key education metrics that are being or could be used in the health sector. Workshop themes include: 1) use of metrics in different settings and at different geographic levels to measure performance and advance goals shared by the health and education sectors, and 2) the possibilities for and any available examples of joint accountability payment models linked with achieving one or more educational outcomes.

42. Member, User Program Community, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2018-present.
• Research Project(s): PI on proposed project(s) in development involving biophysical and -chemical modeling of allosteric ion channel ligand cooperativity, activation kinetics, autocatalysis, modulator interactions, and long-range signal conduction and dynamics for multianalyte macromolecular logics and memory systems significant to natural/artificial biostructure/-function elucidation and rational next-generation drug/device/materials design and repurposing. The Molecular Foundry is a Department of Energy-funded nanoscience research facility that provides users from around the world with access to cutting-edge expertise and instrumentation in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment. Core facilities include imaging and manipulation, theory of nanostructured materials, inorganic nanostructures, biological nanostructures, organic and macromolecular synthesis, and the National Center for Electron Microscopy.

43. Guest Expert, Workshop on Virtual Clinical Trials: Challenges and Opportunities, Board on Health and Science Policy, Division of Health and Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 2018.
• Services Rendered: Providing stakeholder input to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on prospective applications of emerging digital heath tools to establish virtual clinical trials. This public workshop, under the auspices of the Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translations, provides a venue to address and find solutions to challenges facing the US clinical trials enterprise that impair the efficiency, equity, representativeness, and effectiveness of approving novel drugs/medical devices and bringing them to market. Building upon NASEM efforts since 2009, the workshop assesses opportunities for launching and sustaining modern, patient-centric virtual trials – studies that deploy various digital health technologies for remote site visits. Workshop objectives include: 1) exploring current clinical trial infrastructure and potential implications of virtual trials on cost, speed, regulation, knowledge generation and dissemination, clinician and clinical trial participant interfacing, and date integration for improved electronic health records, mobile health applications, remote monitoring, and virtual visits, and 2) exploring improved clinical trial access, equity, and participation through collaborative digital approaches and incentives involving sponsors, researchers, patient advocacy groups, relevant patients, and health systems, such as those pertaining to regulations, quality measures and outcomes, and/or reimbursement strategies.

44. Advisor, NeuroLex Laboratories, Inc and DigiPsych Lab, University of Washington, 2018-present.
• Services Rendered: Advising leadership and other personnel at NeuroLex Laboratories, a seed-stage medical diagnostics company, and the DigiPsych Lab at the University of Washington on topics related to speech analysis for early detection of various neuropsychiatric conditions, including areas significant to seed-stage machine-learning software diagnostics company development and operation, science protocols development and implementation, disease expression, grant funding, and additional areas needed for creating experienced entrepreneurs, scientists, and clinicians for a more vital patient-impacting healthcare industry.

Education and qualifications

1. Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon
• Baccalaureate Studies: Psychology, 1987-1989; B.S., 1989
• Post-baccalaureate/Interdisciplinary Master’s Program Studies: Physiology (Zoology) and Biochemistry/Biophysics, 1989-1991
• Other Studies: Preprofessional Mechanical Engineering, 1984-1987

2. Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois
• Graduate Studies: Psychology, Biopsychology of Learning and Memory and Cognitive and Brain Sciences Programs, 1991-1999; M.A., 1995; Ph.D., 1999

Clark, K.B. (1995). An Electrophysiological Investigation of Possible Distant Effects on Dentate Hilar Granule Cell Evoked Responses from the Intracerebral Microinfusion of Small Volumes into the Rat. Thesis, Southern Illinois University. (Chairperson: Douglas C. Smith, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; Cross-appointment, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine)

*Clark, K.B. (1999). Studies Investigating the Role Played by Vagus Nerve Stimulation in the Modulation of Memory Formation. Dissertation, Southern Illinois University. (Co-Chairpersons: Robert A. Jensen, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; College of Liberal Arts, Acting Dean; Douglas C. Smith, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Associate Professor; Cross-appointment, Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine)

*Research commended by James L. McGaugh, Ph.D., Paul E. Gold, Ph.D., William T. Greenough, Ph.D., and other members of the National Academy of Sciences, USA.

3. Acdemic/Scientific Pedigree

Among other scientists, pedigree includes molecular/cellular evolutionist Sidney W. Fox (1º), neuroscientist/psychologist Nikos K. Logothetis (1º), neuroscientist/psychologist Robert A. Jensen (1º), psycholinguist Dennis L. Molfese (1º), chemist Evgeny Katz (1º), neuroscientist/psychologist/microbiologist Edward M. Eisenstein (1º), biochemist Linus C. Pauling (2º), geneticist Thomas H. Morgan (2º), neuroscientist/psychologist James L. McGaugh (2º), neuroscientist Peter D. Spear (2º), neuroscientist William T. Greenough (2º), neuroscientist Peter H. Schiller (2º), psychologist Larry L. Jacoby (2º), physicist Erwin R.J.A. Schrödinger (3º), physicist Niels H.K. Bohr (3º), neuroscientist/psychologist Kenneth W. Spence (3º), neuroscientist/psychologist Karl S. Lashley (4º), neuroscientist/psychologist Clark L. Hull (4º), primatologist Robert M. Yerkes (4º), psychologist Edward L. Thorndike (4º), physicist Joseph J. Thomson (4º), physicist Ernest Rutherford (4º)

See additional academic/scientific pedigree lines, including Nobelists and other distinguished scientists, at NeuroTree (https://neurotree.org/beta/tree.php?pid=125066).

Publications

(2586 total Google Scholar citations (through fourth quarter of calendar year 2016) with an H-index = 27 and a g-index = 54.35)

1. Selected Research/Theory Articles in Peer-Review Professional Journals
• Ryan, L.J. & Clark, K.B. (1991). The role of the subthalamic nucleus in the response of globus pallidus neurons to stimulation of the prelimbic and agranular frontal cortices in rats. Experimental Brain Research, 86, 641-651.
• Ryan, L.J. & Clark, K.B. (1992). Alteration of neuronal responses in the subthalamic nucleus following globus pallidus and neostriatal lesions in rats. Brain Research Bulletin, 29, 319-327.
• Ryan, L.J., Sanders, D.S. & Clark, K.B. (1992). Auto- and cross-correlation analysis of subthalamic nucleus neuron activity in neostriatal- and globus pallidal-lesioned rats. Brain Research, 583, 253-261.
• Clark, K.B., Krahl, S.E., Smith, D.C. & Jensen, R.A. (1995). Post-training unilateral vagal stimulation enhances retention performance in the rat. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 63(3), 213-216.
• Clark, K.B., Smith, D.C., Hassert, D.L., Browning, R.A., Naritoku, D.K. & Jensen, R.A. (1998). Posttraining electrical stimulation of vagal afferents with concomitant efferent inactivation enhances memory storage processes in the rat. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 70, 364-373.
• Krahl, S.E., Clark, K.B., Smith, D.C. & Browning, R.A. (1998). Locus coeruleus lesions suppress the seizure-attenuating effects of vagus nerve stimulation. Epilepsia, 39(7), 709-714.
• Clark, K.B., Naritoku, D.K., Smith, D.C., Browning, R.A. & Jensen, R.A. (1999). Enhanced recognition memory following vagus nerve stimulation in human subjects. Nature Neuroscience, 2(1), 94-98.
• Clark, K.B., Naritoku, D.K., Smith, D.C., Browning, R.A. & Jensen, R.A. (2003). Enhanced recognition memory following vagus nerve stimulation in humans. Mensa Research Journal, 34(2), 12-23. Reprinted from: Nature Neuroscience, 2(1), 94-98.
• Clark, K.B. (2010). Origins of learned reciprocity in solitary ciliates searching grouped ‘courting’ assurances at quantum efficiencies. BioSystems, 99(1), 27-41.
• Clark, K.B. (2010). Bose-Einstein condensates form in heuristics learned by ciliates deciding to signal ‘social’ commitments. BioSystems, 99(3), 167-178.
• Clark, K.B. (2010). On classical and quantum error-correction in ciliate mate selection. Communicative & Integrative Biology, 3(4), 374-378.
• Clark, K.B. (2010). Arrhenius-kinetics evidence for quantum tunneling in microbial “social” decision rates. Communicative & Integrative Biology, 3(6), 540-544.
• Clark, K.B. (2012). Social biases determine spatiotemporal sparseness of ciliate mating heuristics. Communicative & Integrative Biology, 5(1), 3-11.
• Clark, K.B. (2013). Ciliates learn to diagnose and correct classical error syndromes in mating strategies. Frontiers in Microbiology (Specialty Section: Frontiers in Evolutionary and Genomic Microbiology), 4, 229.
• Clark, K.B. (2014). Basis for a neuronal version of Grover’s quantum algorithm. Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, 7, 29.
• Clark, K.B. (2015). Insight and analysis problem solving in microbes to machines. Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology, 119, 183-193.
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Nonlocality of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channel cooperativity in neuronal function and information binding. Frontiers in Neuroscience (Specialty Section: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience).
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Quantum logics of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channel cooperativity. Frontiers in Physiology (Specialty Section: Frontiers in Membrane Physiology and Biophysics).
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Entropic uncertainty of ciliate behavioral signals limits eavesdropping by mating rivals and predators. Frontiers in Microbiology (Specialty Section: Frontiers in Evolutionary and Genomic Microbiology)
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Classical and quantum Hebbian learning in modeled cognitive processing. Frontiers in Psychology (Specialty Section: Frontiers in Cognition).

2. Selected Invited Editorial/Review/Colloquium Articles in Peer-Review Professional Journals and Electronic Scientific/Educational Resources
• Clark, K.B. (2010). Quantum ‘social’ intelligences expressed by microbes. SciTopics (Elsevier).
• Clark, K.B. (2010). Advances in quantum cell biology and natural computing. Foundations of Information Science (FIS) Digest, 536(1).
• Clark, K.B. (2010). Author’s reply to criticisms of target discussion: “Advances in quantum cell biology and natural computing.” Foundations of Information Science (FIS) Digest, 538(3).
• Clark, K.B. (2010). The question of revisiting or revising the Fluctuon model. Foundations of Information Science (FIS) Digest, 541(14). (Contribution to FIS discussion session, The nature of microphysical information: Revisiting the Fluctuon model. K.G. Kirby & J. Brenner (Chairpersons)).
• Clark, K.B. (2011). Microbial mate selection. SciTopics (Elsevier).
• Clark, K.B. (2011). The social insights and analyses of ciliates. SciTopics (Elsevier).
• Clark, K.B. (2012). Bioreaction quantum computing without quantum diffusion. NeuroQuantology, 10(4), 646-654.
• Krahl, S.E. & Clark, K.B. (2012). Vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy: A review of central mechanisms. Surgical Neurology International, 3(4), S255-259.
• Clark, K.B. & Solé, R.V. (2013). Science and Technology of Microbial Intelligences (Research Topics description). Frontiers in Microbiology (Specialty Sections: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, Frontiers in Microbiotechnology, Ecotoxicology, and Bioremediation, and Frontiers in Evolutionary and Genomic Microbiology).
• Clark, K.B. & Hassert, D.L. (2013). Undecidability and opacity of metacognition in animals and humans. Frontiers in Psychology (Specialty Section: Frontiers in Cognition), 4, 171.
• Clark, K.B. & Eisenstein, E.M. (2013). Targeting host store-operated Ca2+ release to attenuate viral infections. Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, 13(16), 1916-1932.
• Clark, K.B. (2013). Prospects for drug repurposing (Editorial for special issue, New Therapeutic Bearings for Repositioned Drugs, edited by K.B. Clark). Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, 13(18), 2281-2282.
• Clark, K.B., Eisenstein, E.M. & Krahl, S.E. (2013). Calcium antagonists: A ready prescription for treating infectious diseases? Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, 13(18), 2291-2305.
• Clark, K.B. (2013). Biotic activity of Ca2+-modulating nontraditional antimicrobial and -viral agents. Frontiers in Microbiology (Specialty Section: Frontiers in Antimicrobials, Resistance and Chemotherapy), 4, 381. doi: 10.3389/fmicb. 2013.00381
• Clark, K.B. (2014). Evolution of affective and linguistic disambiguation under social eavesdropping pressures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 37(6), 551-552.
• Balch, C., Arias-Pulido, H., Banerjee, S., Lancaster, A., Clark, K.B., Perilstein, M., Hawkins, B., Rhodes, J., Sliz, P., Wilkins, J., & Chittenden, T.W. (2015). Science and technology consortia in US biomedical research: A paradigm shift in response to unsustainable academic growth. BioEssays, 37(2), 119-122.
• Clark, K.B. (June 1, 2015). The STEM-education twin study that almost was. edu|FOCUS.
• Clark, K.B. (2017). The humanness of artificial nonnormative personalities. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 40, e259.
• Clark, K.B. (2017). Dialect structural priming in endangered language evolution, devolution, and protection. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. eLetter.
• Clark, K.B. (2017). Cognitive completeness of quantum teleportation and superdense coding in neuronal response regulation and plasticity. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. eLetter.
• Clark, K.B. (2018). Searching for (Proto)Cellular Logics Proteins in Earth-like Environments Hospitable and Inhospitable to Life. White paper submitted to the Committee on an Astrobiology Science Strategy for the Search for Life in the Universe, National Research Council, Washington,
D.C.
• Clark, K.B. Neural field continuum limits and the partitioning of cognitive-emotional brain networks.
• Clark, K.B. (2018). Natural chunk-and-pass language processing: Just another joint source-channel coding model? Communicative & Integrative Biology, e1445899.
• Clark, K.B. (2018). Possible origins of consciousness in simple control over “involuntary” neuroimmunological action. Consciousness and Cognition, 61, 76-78.
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Unpredictable homeodynamic and ambient constraints on irrational decision making of aneural and neural foragers. Behavioral and Brain Sciences.
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Neurotropic enteroviruses coopt “fair-weather-friend” commensal gut microbiota to drive host infection and CNS disturbances. Behavioral and Brain Sciences.
• Clark, K.B. & Jensen, R.A. (in press). Smart device-driven corticolimbic plasticity in cognitive-emotional restructuring of psychiatric patients.
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Hippocrates’ sound biomedical career-day advice for US students. edu|FOCUS.
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Editorial. Frontiers in Microbiology (Specialty Section: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology).
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Over 100 years of thinking about microbial intelligences. Frontiers in Microbiology (Specialty Section: Frontiers in Microbiotechnology, Ecotoxicology, and Bioremediation).
• Clark, K.B., Eisenstein, E.M. & Katz, E (in press). Quantum molecular logic platforms for theragnostic medicine. Frontiers in Bioscience.

3. Selected Invited Book Chapters and Book Cover Notes
• Clark, K.B. (2011). Live soft-matter quantum computing. In E.C. Salander (Ed.), Computer search algorithms, pp. 1-24. Hauppauge: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. ISBN 978-1-61122-527-3
• Clark, K.B. (2012). Editor’s cover note. In K.B. Clark (Ed.), Bioenergetics. Rijeka: InTech. ISBN 978-953-51-0090-4.
• Clark, K.B. (2012). Preface. In K.B. Clark (Ed.), Bioenergetics, pp. IX-XIX. Rijeka: InTech. ISBN 978-953-51-0090-4.
• Clark, K.B. (2012). A statistical mechanics definition of insight. In A.G. Floares (Ed.), Computational intelligence, pp. 139-162. Hauppauge: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. ISBN 978-1-62081-901-2.
• Clark, K.B. (2013). Editor’s cover note. In K.B. Clark (Ed.), Social learning theory: Phylogenetic considerations across animal, plant, and microbial taxa. Hauppauge: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. ISBN 978-1-62618-268-4.
• Clark, K.B. (2013). Preface. In K.B. Clark (Ed.), Social learning theory: Phylogenetic considerations across animal, plant, and microbial taxa, pp. vii-ix. Hauppauge: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. ISBN 978-1-62618-268-4.
• Clark, K.B. (2013). The mating judgments of microbes. In K.B. Clark (Ed.), Social learning theory: Phylogenetic considerations across animal, plant, and microbial taxa, pp. 173-200. Hauppauge: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. ISBN 978-1-62618-268-4.
• Clark, K.B. (2014). Biotic activity of Ca2+-modulating nontraditional antimicrobial and -viral agents. In R. Aminov, J.D. Nosanchuk, J. Lin, C.F. Amábile-Cuevas, & R.P. Hunter (Eds.), Lose-dose antibiotics: Current status and outlook for the future, pp. 54-57. Frontiers Research Topic Ebook. Frontiers Media SA. ISBN 978-2-88919-355-4.
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Editorial. In K.B. Clark (Ed.), Science and technology of microbial intelligences. Frontiers Research Topic Ebook. Frontiers Media SA.
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Over 100 years of thinking about microbial intelligences. In K.B. Clark (Ed.), Science and technology of microbial intelligences. Frontiers Research Topic Ebook. Frontiers Media SA.
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Ciliates learn to diagnose and correct classical error syndromes in mating strategies. In K.B. Clark (Ed.), Science and technology of microbial intelligences. Frontiers Research Topic Ebook. Frontiers Media SA.
• Clark, K.B. (in press). Entropic uncertainty of ciliate behavioral signals limits eavesdropping by mating rivals and predators. In K.B. Clark (Ed.), Science and technology of microbial intelligences. Frontiers Research Topic Ebook. Frontiers Media SA.
• Clark, K.B. (in preparation). Romanesian social intelligence in ciliates. In K.B. Clark (Ed.), Microbial intelligences.

4. Selected Books
• Clark, K.B., editor (2012). Bioenergetics. Rijeka: InTech. ISBN 978-953-51-0090-4
• Clark, K.B., editor (2013). Social learning theory: Phylogenetic considerations across animal, plant, and microbial taxa. Hauppauge: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. ISBN 978-1-62618-268-4
• Clark, K.B., editors (in press). Science and technology of microbial intelligences. Frontiers Research Topics Ebook. Frontiers Media SA

5. Selected Patents and Invention Reports
• Methods of Treating Traumatic Brain Injury by Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Dean K. Naritoku, Robert A. Jensen, Ronald A. Browning, Kevin B. Clark, Douglas C. Smith & Reese S. Terry, Jr., Patent Number 6,104,956, August 15, 2000.
• Methods of Modulating Aspects of Brain Neural Plasticity by Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Dean K. Naritoku, Robert A. Jensen, Ronald A. Browning, Kevin B. Clark, Douglas C. Smith & Reese S. Terry, Jr., Patent Number 6,339,725, January 15, 2002.
• Methods of Improving Learning or Memory by Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Dean K. Naritoku, Robert A. Jensen, Ronald A. Browning, Kevin B. Clark, Douglas C. Smith & Reese S. Terry, Jr., Patent Number 6,556,868, April 29, 2003.
• Methods of Treating Persistent Impairment of Consciousness by Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Dean K. Naritoku, Robert A. Jensen, Ronald A. Browning, Kevin B. Clark, Douglas C. Smith & Reese S. Terry, Jr., Patent Application Number 20020099417, Filed January 14, 2002.
• Methods for Treating Infectious Diseases Caused by Intelligent Microbial Pathogens, Kevin B. Clark, Edward M. Eisenstein & Scott E. Krahl. Invention Report, University of California at Los Angeles, Office of Intellectual Property and Industry Sponsored Research, Invention Report Number UC-2011-397, Filed December 16, 2010.

6. Guest Journalistic Contributions for Edited Print or Online Newspapers
• Clark, K.B. (May 11, 2010). Benson reflects Portland’s history and culture. The Stump: Oregon opinion articles, political commentary, cartoons and more (A joint venture between OregonLive and The Oregonian).
• Clark, K.B. (August 19, 2012). Tangled web of evolution and despeciation. The Stump: Oregon opinion articles, political commentary, cartoons and more (A joint venture between OregonLive and The Oregonian).

Patents

Methods of Treating Traumatic Brain Injury by Vagus Nerve Stimulation

US6104956

Grant date: Aug 15, 2000

Methods of Improving Learning or Memory by Vagus Nerve Stimulation

US6556868

Grant date: Apr 29, 2003

Methods of Modulating Aspects of Brain Neural Plasticity by Vagus Nerve Stimulation

US6339725

Grant date: Jan 15, 2002

Methods of Treating Persistent Impairment of Consciousness by Vagus Nerve Stimulation

US20020099417

Application date: Jan 14, 2002

Methods for Treating Infectious Diseases Caused by Intelligent Microbial Pathogens

UC2011397

Application date: Dec 16, 2010

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